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Posted by Lois Lowry
Lois Lowry
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on Monday, 26 January 2009 in Uncategorized

Okay, here's how dumb I am. I was told that if I went to the ALA website I could watch the announcements of the Newbery/Caldecott Medals; and so I went to that website, and clicked on something, and sure enough there was a room full of excited people, and committees being introduced, and much cheering at each announcement. It went on for quite a long time. 

When they announced Christopher Paul Curtis's Elijah of Buxton I thought: Gee, I thought that was last year's book. Well, maybe it carried over into this year as well, and lucky him, he's getting awards two years in a row.  Then I thought the same thing when the Caldecott went to Brian Selznick for HUGO CABRET.

You know how this ends, of course. I watched and watched and watched, award after award, and it wasn't until the very end that I realized I was watching the 2008 ceremony, not 2009.

So I simply read the list of this year's winners. Congratulations to Neil Gaiman!

And actually, even though I haven't read any of the award winners---I did know of THE GRAVEYARD BOOK.  Based on reviews, I gave it to one of my step-grandaughters for her 12th birthday this past November. (I think I gave her twin sister THE HUNGER GAMES). 


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Comments

Guest
Krista Monday, 29 November 1999

This post tugged at my heart. My children are 15 and 11. My daughter (15) just flew to U of I to track camp...without me. My days are numbered before they leave home and begin their own journey. Instead of raspberries, I'll be picking avocados. Too bad you'll miss the blueberries. I have my grandmother's bluberry buckle recipe that's guaranteed to add five pounds in two days! Delicious!

Guest
ojimenez Monday, 29 November 1999

It was a lousy blueberry season in 2007, said Siv Wiik, 70, one of a pair of Swedish grandmothers now credited with discovering what experts say may be one of the richest gold deposits in Europe. “That year it was too cold in the spring, so there were few berries,” she said.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/13/world/europe/13sweden.html?_r=1

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